A Time to Stand: The Alamo and the War for Texas Independence – 2 nights (4 hours).  With cries of “Remember the Alamo,” the 18-minute Battle of San Jacinto closed the War for Texas Independence with a Mexican defeat. This class examines the war’s events, with emphasis on the siege of the Alamo, the battles of Gonzales and San Jacinto, the Goliad Massacre, and the Runaway Scrape.
Instructor: Steven Wright
Fee: $55
Time: Thursdays, March 28 and April 4, 6:30 p.m.
To register: Registration has closed


George Washington and Benedict Arnold –1 day (2 hours).  The name of Benedict Arnold has become a synonym for “Traitor.”  Arnold – once the Continental Army’s greatest military hero and, in many ways, the son George Washington never had – betrayed his country and his mentor, while blackening his own reputation forever.
Instructor: Herb Kaufman, M.Ed.
Fee: $30
Time: Saturday, March 30, 10 a.m.
To register: Registration has closed


Pursuing the Graf Spee and Sinking the Bismarck NEW –2 days (4 hours).  In the early days of World War II, the German Kriegsmarine (navy) pinned its hopes on two capital warships – the heavy cruiser Admiral Graf Spee and the battleship Bismarck.  Britain’s Royal Navy was tasked with chasing down and destroying the two leviathans.  The running battles reached dramatic climaxes in December 1939 for the Graf Spee and May 1941 for the Bismarck.
Instructor: Lance Lacey
Fee: $55
Time: Saturdays, April 27 and May 4, 10 a.m.
To register: Registration is closed


Perspectives on the Battle of Gettysburg – ALL DAY EVENT

Find out more about this free event hosted by The Civil War Institute of Manor College and the Delaware Valley Civil War Round table.


History’s Mysteries: Facts and Fictions – NEW – 1 night (2 hours).  Every day, stories are repeated in high schools, museums and television programs because they are catchy, humorous or entertaining (“Would you really bite a bullet?” … “Did George Washington actually have wooden teeth?” … “Where did Paul Revere really ride?”).  There are also many actual events, incidents and nefarious personalities that are purposely left out of history education. Historical knowledge is often imperfect or erroneously portrayed by myths, half-truths, general omissions – or even total fabrication. This program focuses on unusual and often controversial events that they never taught in school.
Instructor: Herb Kaufman, M.Ed.
Fee: $30
Time: Wednesday, June 19, 6:30-8:30 p.m.
To register: call (215) 884-2218 or register online with a credit card


The Conflict Ignites:  Lexington and Concord –NEW – 1 night (2 hours).  The American poet Ralph Waldo Emerson called it “The Shot Heard Round the World,” when British troops marched into the Massachusetts countryside to seize stockpiled guns and supplies. They met resistance before dawn on April 19, 1775, in Lexington. From Lexington, the British moved to Concord to complete their mission. The American Revolution for Independence had begun.  This class will include slides of the area where the battles took place, as well as replica uniforms and equipment from the period.
Instructor: Mike Jesberger
Fee: $30
Time: Monday, July 22, 6:30-8:30pm
To register: call (215) 884-2218 or register online with a credit card


The Bridge on the River Kwai: Survival on the Death Railway – NEW –1 night (2 hours).  The movie “Bridge on the River Kwai” won seven Academy Awards in 1958. The real “bridge” was only one of more than 600 bridges built along the 258-mile “death railway.” The entire railway was constructed using more than 61,000 Allied prisoners of war and approximately 250,000 Asian forced laborers. This course will cover the real stories of their capture in Malaya, Singapore, the Dutch East Indies and Burma. It will explore the horrendous experiences, the deaths and murders, and many inspiring stories of endurance by those who survived.
Instructor: Walt Lafty
Fee: $30
Time: Thursday, Aug. 22 6:30-8:30pm
To register: call (215) 884-2218 or register online with a credit card